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CLT UPDATE
Tuesday, April 27, 2010

Taxpayers win a big one; CLT saves Proposition 2½ again!


 

House leaders backed off a proposal to allow communities to raise property taxes beyond the 2.5 percent annual cap in order to pay for tax abatements without a fight, striking it from a larger municipal-relief bill aimed at helping cities and towns manage their local budgets in the face of state-aid cuts.

House Speaker Robert DeLeo, responding to widespread criticism from Republicans and members of his own party, stripped the controversial proposal from the bill. Instead, he allowed an amendment offered by Republican leadership to sail through as the House began debate on the larger package of reforms....

House Ways and Means Chairman Charlie Murphy, D-Burlington, adamantly defended the proposal, which he wrote as a way for cities and towns to better manage their budgets. He denied that the change "equated to a tax increase," and said it would not alter the basic protections of Proposition 2½.

"Charlie Murphy is adamantly wrong," mocked House Minority Leader Brad Jones when asked about Murphy's defense. "They'll probably admit that they didn't do a good job explaining why this wasn't a tax increase, because it is." ...

Earlier in the day, Republican gubernatorial candidate Charlie Baker and his running mate, state Sen. Richard Tisei, joined Barbara Anderson, executive director of Citizens for Limited Taxation, in criticizing one-party leadership on Beacon Hill.

Anderson first brought attention to the issue of property taxes last week, prompting Baker, Patrick and Treasurer Tim Cahill, an independent running for governor, to come out against the overlay exclusion.

"They didn't think anyone would notice," Anderson said yesterday at a press conference on the steps of the Statehouse.

The Lowell Sun
Tuesday, April 27, 2010
House has no appetite to change Prop. 2½


The Massachusetts House voted yesterday to scrap a proposal that critics said could have raised property taxes by as much as $500 million.

The measure, which would have let cities and towns raise taxes above the limit set by Proposition 2½ to pay property tax abatements, came under fire from Gov. Deval Patrick, who said he would not sign a municipal-relief bill if the measure was included....

The now-defeated change would have allowed communities to increase the allowed levy by the amount in the community's overlay account. The money in that account goes to citizens who successfully win tax abatements. Money left over in the account can be used for anything at all, according to Barbara Anderson, whose group Citizens for Limited Taxation helped push through Prop. 2½.

Anderson said lawmakers were trying to slip through what would effectively be an end run around Prop. 2½.

"They didn't think anyone would notice," Anderson said yesterday at a press conference with Baker on the Statehouse steps. "We think we've gotten them to back down." ...

Not everyone on Beacon Hill was pushing for lower taxes.

In his proposed $28.2 billion state budget plan, Patrick called for increasing taxes on candy and soda and smokeless tobacco.

House leaders said their version of the budget doesn't include any tax increases, although individual members are pushing for additional revenue.

Associated Press
Monday, April 26, 2010
House votes to scrap tax plan to skirt Proposition 2½


Embattled House leaders yesterday dropped a controversial plan to allow communities to ignore limits on property tax hikes proscribed by Proposition 2½.

A spokesman for House Speaker Robert A. DeLeo said the tax-hike plan rolled out by Ways and Means chief state Rep. Charles A. Murphy didn’t have the support of leadership.

“The speaker has consistently said he doesn’t support any tax increase or any weakening of Proposition 2½,” said DeLeo spokesman Seth Gitell.

The provision was contained in a so-called municipal-relief bill passed last night, aimed at helping beleaguered cities and towns cope with an anticipated $234 million local aid cut. Citizens for Limited Taxation estimated it would have cost taxpayers as much as $500 million.

However, proponents said it would have allowed communities to raise property taxes above the 2½ limit to pay for abatements when homeowners successfully appeal their tax bills.

The measure was stripped out by an amendment filed by Republicans, who with anti-tax activists called the scheme an end-around Proposition 2½.

House Republican Leader Brad Jones (R-North Reading) called it a “significant step to protect the wallets of taxpayers.”

Gitell said the item will not resurface in the fiscal 2011 budget the House debates this week.

The Boston Herald
Tuesday, April 27, 2010
House KOS bid to kill Prop 2½
Plan lacked support


"This year, when voters are so angry, when the tea partiers are partying when people have really had enough, the last thing I expected was them to do was attack proposition 2½." -- Barbara Anderson

New England Cable News
Monday, April 26, 2010
Candidates for Mass. Governor spar over taxes
[Link to video below]


The back-and-forth over taxes was ignited after House Ways and Means chairman Charles A. Murphy proposed a measure last week that would have allowed cities and towns to raise taxes above the limit set by Proposition 2½ to pay for property tax abatements.

Republicans said that the change could have increased property taxes by as much as $500 million. Patrick, Baker, and Cahill all oppose the measure, as does Senate President Therese Murray, who said yesterday that she, too, would oppose any such change. Yesterday, House lawmakers quietly killed Murphy’s plan on a voice vote without debate.

The House was slated yesterday to debate other measures pushed by a small band of Democrats that would remove the sales tax exemption for candy and soda, mirroring Patrick’s proposed budget for the upcoming fiscal year, and increase the tax on stock dividends and interest from 5 percent to 12 percent, a rate last used in the 1990s.

Supporters said the taxes would generate about $550 million to stave off deep cuts in public health programs, local aid, and other areas.

The House, however, is expected to reject the tax increases, said Seth Gitell, a spokesman for Speaker Robert A. DeLeo, who has pledged not to raise taxes in the House’s proposed budget for the upcoming fiscal year.

The Boston Globe
Tuesday, April 27, 2010
GOP launches ad attack on Cahill
Candidates swap charges over taxes


ONE Massachusetts and members of more than a dozen other groups hold a press availability in favor of Rep. Matt Patrick’s amendments to the House budget to add new taxes aimed at supporting services....

In a letter to colleagues, Patrick urged them to support proposals to ... raise $500 million.

Groups supporting the amendments include the Massachusetts Teachers Association, the Coalition Against Poverty, the Coalition for Social Justice, the Boston Parent Organizing Network, the Massachusetts Community Action Network, the Mass Society of Professors at UMass Amherst, Mass Home Care, Project RIGHT, Yes! Northampton, Health Care for All, the Massachusetts Public Health Association, the Public Higher Education Network of Massachusetts and New England United for Justice.

State House News Service
 Monday, April 26, 2010
Daily State House Schedule



Chip Ford's CLT Commentary

It was a frenetic week for Citizens for Limited Taxation, but saving taxpayers is always worth the effort. And beating back the tax-borrow-and spend hordes is always so rewarding.

Our thanks to all of you who were part of property taxpayers' salvation, who contacted your state representative and senator, told them "hands off Prop 2½!"

And thanks from all of us to the GOP legislators and Charlie Baker who responded immediately to our Mayday call for their assistance and support.

Special thanks to tax assessor Stanley Nacewicz, who called and brought this stealth attack to our attention last Wednesday afternoon. If he hadn't, it may have slipped by even us -- until the property tax bills arrived in the mail with a shocking increase.

As soon as we investigated, Barbara knew exactly what was being pulled up on Bacon Hill; CLT had fought this maneuver a number of times over the years. Incredibly it was back. Again the insatiable pols hoped nobody would notice, and if they somehow did, they wouldn't understand, and even if they grasped the scam they would be unable to act quickly enough to stop it.

Once we managed to publicize this scurrilous assault on property taxpayers and enlisted our political allies, its suddenly exposed proponents saw the handwriting on the wall in an election year. Especially this election year -- Revolution 2010.

Consider how much this tax hike would have cost taxpayers, every homeowner across the state -- if CLT had been forced to close its doors last year as then seemed inevitable, until members like you came to its rescue with your generous contributions!

Barbara estimated $550 million more; The lead sponsor, House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Charles Murphy (D-Burlington), admitted to $164 million -- but insisted it isn't really a tax hike, and it wouldn't be a permanent increase anyway -- it was to be just another one of those little "temporary" tax increases.

Thirty years ago this November CLT and its members provided Massachusetts taxpayers with Proposition 2½.

Yesterday we saved it from destruction, again.

But eternal vigilance means never resting, and the next attack is already rising over the horizon. Even as we were on the front steps of the State House saving Prop 2½, the Gimme Lobby was gathered within the walls plotting the next tax increases. Does it surprise you that among those lusting for more of your money is -- the Massachusetts Teachers Association?

Let's all hope CLT is still alive for the next round of tax hike assaults.

Chip Ford

Click above thumbnail or here for more of yesterday's photos

 

The Lowell Sun
Tuesday, April 27, 2010

House has no appetite to change Prop. 2½
By Matt Murphy


House leaders backed off a proposal to allow communities to raise property taxes beyond the 2.5 percent annual cap in order to pay for tax abatements without a fight, striking it from a larger municipal-relief bill aimed at helping cities and towns manage their local budgets in the face of state-aid cuts.

House Speaker Robert DeLeo, responding to widespread criticism from Republicans and members of his own party, stripped the controversial proposal from the bill. Instead, he allowed an amendment offered by Republican leadership to sail through as the House began debate on the larger package of reforms.

The concession staved off a potential showdown between the House and Gov. Deval Patrick, who threatened last week to veto the bill if the change to Proposition 2½ reached his desk.

Voters in 1980 approved Proposition 2½, limiting the annual increase of property taxes by municipalities to 2.5 percent of the previous year's levy, plus new growth. Last week, a key House committee advanced a proposed change to the law that would have allowed towns to raise money beyond the 2.5 percent cap to fund a revolving overlay account used to pay property-tax rebates for homeowners.

House Ways and Means Chairman Charlie Murphy, D-Burlington, adamantly defended the proposal, which he wrote as a way for cities and towns to better manage their budgets. He denied that the change "equated to a tax increase," and said it would not alter the basic protections of Proposition 2½.

"Charlie Murphy is adamantly wrong," mocked House Minority Leader Brad Jones when asked about Murphy's defense. "They'll probably admit that they didn't do a good job explaining why this wasn't a tax increase, because it is."

As House lawmakers learned of the proposal late last week, many Democrats joined their Republican colleagues in coming out against the plan, pointing to the speaker's own pledge that the House budget would not include any new taxes.

"Anything tinkering with Proposition 2½ that could result in a tax increase at this point in time is ludicrous," said state Rep. Kevin Murphy, D-Lowell.

Cities and towns across the commonwealth set aside $164.4 million to pay for tax rebates and exemptions in 2010.

State Rep. Thomas Golden, D-Lowell, reiterated his opposition to the plan and said he is pleased that leadership did not fight to keep it in the bill.

"It had no business being in there in the first place," Golden said. "People right now can't afford any increase to their property taxes."

DeLeo issued a statement last week citing his opposition to tinkering with Proposition 2½, but did not explicitly close the door on the adjustment for overlay accounts. DeLeo spokesman Seth Gitell yesterday referred to that original statement any questions about the speaker's decision to pull the provision back.

The larger municipal-relief package passed the House unanimously but failed to address the one thing municipal leaders have been crying out for -- health-care plan design.

Local leaders, including Lowell City Manager Bernie Lynch, have been pressing for the power to make changes to employee health-benefit plans without collective bargaining, the same authority the state has over its employees.

But the relief bill did not address plan design.

The bill would give cities and towns a number of local options to save money next year as they prepare to absorb a 4 percent cut to local aid. Provisions in the bill include:

Extending the schedule to fully fund local pension plans from 2030 to 2040.

Allowing municipalities to enter into 30-year leases without legislative approval, an increase of 10 years.

Allowing cities and towns to join a statewide mutual-aid agreement to provide assistance to neighboring communities for police, fire and EMS services.

Offering early retirement to municipal employees with at least 20 years of service, excluding teachers.

Earlier in the day, Republican gubernatorial candidate Charlie Baker and his running mate, state Sen. Richard Tisei, joined Barbara Anderson, executive director of Citizens for Limited Taxation, in criticizing one-party leadership on Beacon Hill.

Anderson first brought attention to the issue of property taxes last week, prompting Baker, Patrick and Treasurer Tim Cahill, an independent running for governor, to come out against the overlay exclusion.

"They didn't think anyone would notice," Anderson said yesterday at a press conference on the steps of the Statehouse.

Baker said the first impulse of Democrats is to raise taxes instead of cutting the budget and living within their means.

"It's troubling that we have to continually fight to protect Proposition 2½," Baker said.

Baker reiterated his support for rolling back the state income tax from 5.3 percent to 5 percent, and the sales tax from 6.25 percent to 5 percent. He said he hopes to accomplish both goals within his first term as governor. He also said he would eliminate 5,000 jobs in the executive branch.

Patrick responded by criticizing Baker for failing to tell voters what services he plans to cut to make up for the loss in revenue.


Associated Press
Monday, April 26, 2010

House votes to scrap tax plan to skirt Proposition 2½
By Steve LeBlanc


The Massachusetts House voted yesterday to scrap a proposal that critics said could have raised property taxes by as much as $500 million.

The measure, which would have let cities and towns raise taxes above the limit set by Proposition 2½ to pay property tax abatements, came under fire from Gov. Deval Patrick, who said he would not sign a municipal-relief bill if the measure was included.

Patrick's top opponents in the race for governor, Republican Charles Baker and independent Timothy Cahill, also said they were against the plan.

Prop. 2½ was approved by voters in 1980 and radically changed the way cities and towns raise taxes to pay for municipal services. It limits communities from raising property taxes by more than 2.5 percent a year over the previous year's levy (plus a factor for "new growth") without approval from voters.

The now-defeated change would have allowed communities to increase the allowed levy by the amount in the community's overlay account. The money in that account goes to citizens who successfully win tax abatements. Money left over in the account can be used for anything at all, according to Barbara Anderson, whose group Citizens for Limited Taxation helped push through Prop. 2½.

Anderson said lawmakers were trying to slip through what would effectively be an end run around Prop. 2½.

"They didn't think anyone would notice," Anderson said yesterday at a press conference with Baker on the Statehouse steps. "We think we've gotten them to back down."

Rep. Joyce Spiliotis, D-Peabody, co-sponsored an amendment with House Minority Leader Brad Jones of North Reading to strike the language from the municipal-relief bill.

"The handwriting was on the wall," Spiliotis said. "We struck the language because they knew they wouldn't have the votes to pass it."

Spiliotis couldn't believe what she was reading when going through the portion of the municipal relief package that dealt with Proposition 2½. She even asked her legislative aide to read it also.

"Nobody saw the language until the bill came out," Spiliotis said.

Legislators in a conference committee hammered out the details of the bill although there were hearings on portions of the bill.

Rep. Brad Hill, R-Ipswich, agreed.

"Most of the legislators didn't understand (the proposal) when it came out that it could be perceived as a back way of raising taxes without representation from the citizens of the community," Hill said. "For those reasons, (not adopting the proposal) was the right thing to do."

If legislators want to change Proposition 2½, Hill said the House needs "to have a discussion that's public and not something thrown into a very big bill."

"(Citizens in my district) were very concerned this was a way to increase taxes, and this did not sit well," Hill said.

The question of whether to give cities and towns more flexibility on property taxes comes amid a larger debate about when to raise or cut taxes.

Baker seized on the opportunity to renew his call for lower taxes.

Baker said if elected he would try to lower the state income tax rate from 5.3 percent to 5 percent. He said he'd also try to roll back the state sales tax rate from 6.25 percent to 5 percent.

"My goal would be to do it within my first term," he said. "It's obviously a function of a lot of moving parts."

He said lowering the two taxes would create a $1.4 billion budget hole. He said he would close that hole by eliminating 5,000 jobs in the executive branch, or about 10 percent of the total, and by "dramatically streamlining state government's operating model."

Baker stopped short of endorsing a proposed question for the November ballot that would lower the sales tax rate to 3 percent. Baker said that would make it virtually impossible for him to avoid local aid cuts.

Paul Loscocco, running for lieutenant governor on the same ticket as Cahill, faulted Baker's running mate Sen. Richard Tisei for voting against an income tax rollback in 2000.

Tisei said he voted over a dozen times to roll the income tax back, but on one occasion voted against it because he was concerned about local aid. He said he's since learned the best thing to do is to cut off increased revenues so state government will stop spending.

Not everyone on Beacon Hill was pushing for lower taxes.

In his proposed $28.2 billion state budget plan, Patrick called for increasing taxes on candy and soda and smokeless tobacco.

House leaders said their version of the budget doesn't include any tax increases, although individual members are pushing for additional revenue.

Staff writer Bruno Matarazzo Jr. contributed to this report.


The Boston Herald
Tuesday, April 27, 2010

House KOS bid to kill Prop 2½
Plan lacked support
By Edward Mason

Embattled House leaders yesterday dropped a controversial plan to allow communities to ignore limits on property tax hikes proscribed by Proposition 2½.

A spokesman for House Speaker Robert A. DeLeo said the tax-hike plan rolled out by Ways and Means chief state Rep. Charles A. Murphy didn’t have the support of leadership.

“The speaker has consistently said he doesn’t support any tax increase or any weakening of Proposition 2½,” said DeLeo spokesman Seth Gitell.

The provision was contained in a so-called municipal-relief bill passed last night, aimed at helping beleaguered cities and towns cope with an anticipated $234 million local aid cut. Citizens for Limited Taxation estimated it would have cost taxpayers as much as $500 million.

However, proponents said it would have allowed communities to raise property taxes above the 2½ limit to pay for abatements when homeowners successfully appeal their tax bills.

The measure was stripped out by an amendment filed by Republicans, who with anti-tax activists called the scheme an end-around Proposition 2½.

House Republican Leader Brad Jones (R-North Reading) called it a “significant step to protect the wallets of taxpayers.”

Gitell said the item will not resurface in the fiscal 2011 budget the House debates this week.

Gov. Deval Patrick had pledged to veto the bill if the measure was included, and Senate President Therese Murray said she would oppose it in the Senate.

Propositon 2½ was approved by voters in 1980. Cities and towns can’t hike property taxes by more than 2.5 percent a year without voters approval.

The municipal bill passed by the House contains a number of provisions aimed at saving cash-strapped cities money, including allowing communities to delay fully funding their pension obligations and encouraging early-retirement programs but requiring positions be filled by lower-wage workers.


New England Cable News
Monday, April 26, 2010

  Candidates for Mass. Governor spar over taxes

(NECN: Alison King) - This week Massachusetts candidates for Massachusetts Governor weigh in on how they would handle taxes if elected to office.

Sen. Bruce Tarr (R-Gloucester): We continue to see things like proposed increases on alcohol, candy, soda and the list goes on and on and on.

It is the time tested and reliable way for Republicans to score points in Democratic dominated Massachusetts: Rail against taxes and one party rule.

Which is why candidate for Governor, Charlie Baker joined Republican lawmakers in the fight against a Democrat sponsored bill that opponents says could raise property taxes by as much as $550 million dollars this year without voter approval.

Charlie Baker: This is what happens when one party's in charge on Beacon Hill. The impulse, the first impulse when times get tough is not to cut the budget, not to reform the way things work, not to find a less simpler, less expensive way of doing business, but instead, to push the tax button.

Two of Baker's lead opponents, Democrat Deval Patrick and Independent Tim Cahill, have the same stance on the Prop-2½ proposal: They are also against it, but that didn't stop Baker from enlisting anti-tax advocate Barbara Anderson to hammer home his message.

Barbara Anderson: This year, when voters are so angry, when the tea partiers are partying when people have really had enough, the last thing I expected was them to do was attack proposition 2½.

Just before Baker's news conference, word got out from House Speaker Robert DeLeo's office that the controversial proposition 2½ provision will be taken out of the municipal relief bill - sparking Republicans to claim victory -- then weigh in on other taxes they'd slash.

Baker: We should get the income tax back to five percent. Something Tim Cahill and Deval Patrick were both opposed to.

Baker also says the sales tax should be rolled back to five percent -- and he says he'd aim to do it in his first term.

Patrick: I have seen more examples of a lack of integrity out of that campaign and this is just another one. Until they start talking about what services they're going to cut, then we're not going to have a serious conversation.

Governor Patrick says he would also like to rollback some taxes -- but not until the economy recovers.

Tim Cahill: I support rolling back both the income tax and the sales tax to five percent as soon as possible. I'm also looking at corporate and capitol gains to make the state more competitive.

Tim Cahill is playing second fiddle to no one when it comes to cutting taxes:

Charlie Baker says he'd roll back taxes by about 1.4-1.5 billion dollars in his first term.


The Boston Globe
Tuesday, April 27, 2010

GOP launches ad attack on Cahill
Candidates swap charges over taxes
By Michael Levenson


The Republican Governors Association, hoping to clear a path for Charles D. Baker, will launch a hard-hitting television and radio ad campaign today targeting state Treasurer Timothy P. Cahill, an independent who is trying to outflank Baker on the right in this year’s governor’s race, a spokesman for the association said yesterday.

The ad campaign, the first major ad buy of the gubernatorial contest, was made as Baker and Cahill battle to become the prime alternative to Governor Deval Patrick, who polls suggest is vulnerable.

“We’re going to be making the argument that Tim Cahill is just like Deval Patrick, but worse, with regard to his record on fiscal issues and being reckless with taxpayer money,’’ said Tim Murtaugh, a spokesman for the association.

Murtaugh declined to say how much the group was spending on the ads, but said it was a significant sum that would pay for airtime on cable and broadcast television, as well as radio.

The ad campaign, he said, was not coordinated with the Baker campaign, in keeping with federal campaign finance laws that prohibit independent groups from buying ads on a candidate’s behalf.

The organization chose to run the ads in Massachusetts “because we’re paying close attention, and we think it’s a good opportunity for a pickup,’’ Murtaugh said.

Cahill’s political director, Jordan Gehrke, wrote on Twitter last night that the ads showed that Republicans are desperate after a poll last week showed Cahill in second place behind Patrick.

The association ran a similar ad last year when the GOP candidate in the New Jersey governor’s race, Christopher Christie, was in a three-way battle. That ad also took aim at the independent candidate, Christopher Daggett, accusing him of being like the incumbent Democratic governor, Jon Corzine, “only worse.’’ Christie eventually won the race.

The ad targeting Cahill hits the airwaves as Patrick, Baker, and Cahill are trading some of their sharpest jabs to date over taxes and spending, and as House lawmakers take up a series of controversial tax measures.

Patrick took particular aim at Baker yesterday, accusing him of pushing lower state income and sales tax rates without explaining what programs he would cut to offset the loss of approximately $1.4 billion in annual revenue.

“I have to tell you, I have seen more examples of a lack of integrity out of that campaign, and this is just another one,’’ the governor told reporters, hours after Baker held a press conference outside the State House to blast Patrick for his fiscal management.

“Until they propose what . . . the public will do without, then we’re not going to have a serious conversation,’’ Patrick said, according to State House News Service.

At his press conference, Baker said he would cut 5,000 jobs, or about 10 percent of the executive branch, and begin “dramatically streamlining state government’s operating model.’’ But he did not say which programs or agencies would be targeted for reductions.

Instead, Baker and his running mate, Senate minority leader Richard R. Tisei, reiterated their vow not to increase taxes and criticized Patrick for signing an increase in the sales tax, from 5 percent to 6.25 percent, to help close a state budget gap last year.

“This is what happens when one party is in charge on Beacon Hill,’’ Baker said. “The first impulse when times get tough . . . is to push the tax button. The first impulse should be to reform.’’

Cahill fired back at Baker by releasing a statement slamming Tisei for voting against a proposed reduction in the state income tax in 2000.

“The dog-and-pony show today from the Baker campaign was a little amusing, considering Baker’s running mate, Richard Tisei, was the only Republican to vote against the income tax rollback in 2000,’’ said the statement from Cahill’s running mate, Paul Loscocco. “If the Baker campaign wants to focus this debate on the candidate’s records on tax cuts, we are happy to have that conversation.’’

Cahill, like Baker, said he supports reducing the income tax from 5.3 percent to 5 percent and the sales tax to 5 percent.

Tisei, a Wakefield Republican, said he has voted to lower the income tax more than a dozen times but voted against it in 2000 because he was concerned about cutting local aid. He suggested he now regrets the vote.

The back-and-forth over taxes was ignited after House Ways and Means chairman Charles A. Murphy proposed a measure last week that would have allowed cities and towns to raise taxes above the limit set by Proposition 2½ to pay for property tax abatements.

Republicans said that the change could have increased property taxes by as much as $500 million. Patrick, Baker, and Cahill all oppose the measure, as does Senate President Therese Murray, who said yesterday that she, too, would oppose any such change. Yesterday, House lawmakers quietly killed Murphy’s plan on a voice vote without debate.

The House was slated yesterday to debate other measures pushed by a small band of Democrats that would remove the sales tax exemption for candy and soda, mirroring Patrick’s proposed budget for the upcoming fiscal year, and increase the tax on stock dividends and interest from 5 percent to 12 percent, a rate last used in the 1990s.

Supporters said the taxes would generate about $550 million to stave off deep cuts in public health programs, local aid, and other areas.

The House, however, is expected to reject the tax increases, said Seth Gitell, a spokesman for Speaker Robert A. DeLeo, who has pledged not to raise taxes in the House’s proposed budget for the upcoming fiscal year.


State House News Service
Monday, April 26, 2010

Daily State House Schedule
[Excerpt]

11:00.....BAKER-TISEI PRESS CONFERENCE: Republican candidate for governor Charles Baker and running mate Sen. Richard Tisei will join Barbara Anderson, executive director of Citizens for Limited Taxation, for a press conference. The Baker-Tisei campaign is calling it a "One Party Rule Run Amok Press Conference".....State House steps.

11:30.....NEW TAXES: ONE Massachusetts and members of more than a dozen other groups hold a press availability in favor of Rep. Matt Patrick’s amendments to the House budget to add new taxes aimed at supporting services.

In a letter to colleagues, Patrick urged them to support proposals to eliminate the sales tax exemption on soda and candy to generate $51.7 million for public health programs. Another amendment would increase the tax rate on investment interest and dividends to 12 percent, with an exemption for moderate income families, to raise $500 million.

Groups supporting the amendments include the Massachusetts Teachers Association, the Coalition Against Poverty, the Coalition for Social Justice, the Boston Parent Organizing Network, the Massachusetts Community Action Network, the Mass Society of Professors at UMass Amherst, Mass Home Care, Project RIGHT, Yes! Northampton, Health Care for All, the Massachusetts Public Health Association, the Public Higher Education Network of Massachusetts and New England United for Justice.....Outside of the House Chamber.


 

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