Looking to the next generation for change
© by Barbara Anderson


The Salem News
Thursday, February 18, 2016


ďA perfect day, the sun is sinkiní low
As evening falls, the gentle breezes blow
The time we shared went by so fast
Just like a dream, we knew it couldnít last
But Iíd do it all again
If I could, somehow
But I must be leaviní soon
Itís your world now
Use well the time
Be part of something good
Leave something good behind
The curtain falls
I take my bow
Thatís how itís meant to be
Itís your world now.Ē

ďLong Road Out Of Eden,Ē Eagles, 2007  

Listen Here

This week Iím a year older; my family visited for the long weekend from northern Nevada, and as they left I thought of this Eagles song.

Not that gentle breezes were blowing. Though they live in the high desert, at the foot of the Sierra, they hadnít encountered 9 degrees below zero. My daughter-in-law and granddaughter didnít want to leave the house; my son and grandson kept walking down to Salem Harbor to watch it freeze. Their Lake Tahoe is too deep to freeze.

I taught the twins to make my birthday chocolate refrigerator cake; then introduced them to Mrs. Tís classic pierogies, which they lined up at the stove to collect from the big pot. This is not a grandmother who serves a family dinner at a formal dining room table; donít have a dining room, they ate with their plates on their laps in the living room.

I am a grandmother who set them in front of Chipís larger television for the Republican debate. My son and his wife have the Nevada Democrat Caucus to attend, and a decision to make there; I asked the twins to help me decide on a Republican candidate for March 1. They both listened carefully, as nearly as one can tell when phones and thumbs are also in the room, and said during a commercial break that they liked the look and sound of Marco Rubio. Their mother then insisted they stay there to hear discussion on social issues. Like me, she is appalled by Rubioís position on abortion and gay marriage. Finally, my family and I agree on two candidates: we wonít choose Rubio, and were turned off by Donald Trumpís behavior during the debate.

As a deficit hawk, Iím no fan of former president George W. Bush, but he was not to blame for Sept. 11 and though mistaken along with our allies about Iraq, I donít think he deliberately lied about it; Trumpís accusation was just a cheap shot.

By the way, the twins have Common Core in their Nevada schools and donít like it. In many ways the part-time Nevada Legislature is better than ours, though. I was watching the Grammys and flipping back to Fox 25 news, saw one of my Citizens for Limited Taxation partners, Chip Faulkner, interviewed on a report by Eric Rasmussen about ďmissing state property costing taxpayers millions. Hundreds of state-owned items, including many laptops and other electronics, have been lost or stolen since 2012, according to Massachusetts records obtained by FOX25 Investigates.Ē

Chip said that when he agreed to do the interview, he expected to hear about a few carelessly misplaced items, not millions of dollars ó of not just laptops ó but bags of cash from state agencies that just vanished! This is why we oppose tax hikes, period. Fortunately Gov. Baker agrees with us and will be focusing on reforms.

His first priority has been dealing with the MBTA and ignoring for now the pleas for a gas tax hike. I remember an assault on Prop 2Ĺ back in 1980: part of our voter-passed property tax limit also limited T assessments on MBTA communities to 4 percent. Instead, the T needed and got a 17 percent increase. Since then it got a gas tax hike in 1990 and part of the sales tax, which was increased by Gov. Deval Patrick. It should be obvious that giving the T more money will accomplish nothing.

And speaking of Deval Patrick: The mere mention of the name of this incompetent former governor is one reason Republican senators are balking at replacing the suddenly deceased Justice Antonin Scalia until their own president hopefully appoints someone their own party can confirm as the Constitution requires.

At first it does seem unreasonable not to allow the sitting president his choice of nominee late in his term, unless one has seen that precedent set by Democrats when there is a vacancy during the late term of a Republican president. And I get it ó this is a very important decision, one that can set the direction of America for the rest of its life.

I know most Americans donít pay attention to the U.S. Supreme Court, until an election year when some voters worry about a new president appointing someone who will repeal Roe v. Wade or not validate our Second Amendment right to bear arms. I saw the Court in the Kelo decision allow private property to be taken from small businessmen and cottage owners and given to developers, something which Trump supports and most citizens, conservatives and liberals alike, deplored.

Instead of still trying to choose the candidate Iíll vote for, and worrying about the Supreme Court, it would have been nice to spend my birthday celebrating the exciting MIT scientific validation of Einsteinís theory of gravitational waves. As near as I can understand, our own Big Bang may have been created by two black holes crashing into each other ó making the age of the universe so much greater than we had thought. Puts my own age into perspective, for sure.

Of course MIT, at the time it was publicizing its extraordinary achievement, had faculty and students arguing that its superiors should be called ďhead of houseĒ instead of ďhousemaster,Ē which apparently offends someone. If life began with magnificent scientific explosion, it could end by silly petty political-correctness.

Címon, next generation: Itís your world now. Fix all this.

Barbara Anderson of Marblehead is a weekly columnist for the Salem News and Eagle-Tribune Publishing Company.


The comments made and opinions expressed in her columns are those of Barbara Anderson
and do not necessarily reflect those of Citizens for Limited Taxation.


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Citizens for Limited Taxation    PO Box 1147    Marblehead, MA 01945    508-915-3665